Top 20 Programming Languages of Hacker News Readers January 2013

Just like anyone, programmers are meticulous about their work as one simple line could ruin months of work.   And reaching the ultimate goal may take longer if they are not using the language they are accustomed to.

In April year, Hacker News conducted a poll regarding the top languages used by programmers in writing codes and Python came out at the top with 3,044 votes.  Come September, RedMonk released the result of its very own poll and JavaScript came in first while Python was at fourth place.

RedMonk once again released the results for January 2013 and it’s almost identical to the list from last year.

  1. JavaScript

  2. Java

  3. PHP

  4. Python

  5. Ruby

  6. C#

  7. C++

  8. C

  9. Objective-C

  10. Perl

  11. Shell

  12. Scala

  13. ASP

  14. Haskell

  15. Assembly

  16. ActionScript

  17. R

  18. CoffeeScript

  19. Visual Basic

  20. MATLAB

The first nine languages stayed the same when compared to the September list, but Perl has overtaken Shell, ASP has overtaken Haskell, CoffeeScript overtook Visual Basic, and Groovy dropped out of the Top 20 and was replaced by MATLAB.

Interestingly, CodeEval released its own statistics regarding the “Most Popular Programming Languages” in 2013 and Python took the top spot at 29.8 percent, while Java came in second at 25.8 percent, followed by C++ at 12.6 percent, Ruby at 9.6 percent, PHP at 7.3 percent, C 4.9 percent, Javascript 3.9 percent, C# 2.5 percent, Perl 2 percent, Clojure 0.8 percent, Scala 0.6 percent, Objective C 0.1 percent, and TCL at 0.02 percent.

Note: Statistics and Figures are based on a sample size of over 100,000+ challenges processed from Employers who have run challenges on CodeEval in 2012.

The disparity on the lists may be brought about by the difference in the demographics of the sample population used.  Also, there’s no assurance for the legitimacy of these polls since we are not sure if respondents are actually programmers and if voting is screened that you can only do it once.  Also, some of these polls may be biased since the one behind it may have been influenced.  Still, it is great to have an idea of what other programmers are using to write codes.

About Mellisa Tolentino

Mellisa is a staff writer for SiliconAngle, covering social and mobile news. She is fascinated by technology and loves imparting what she learns through her journey as a writer. Got a news story or tip? Send it to mellisa@siliconangle.com